Moving With Small Pets

The challenge of moving pets has not changed since Olympia posted our Checklist for Moving With Pets. However, there are more factors to consider when moving pets other than dogs and cats. Fido and Streaky can be crated without too much fuss, but Nemo the fish and Treeko the lizard will need more specialized care. Here are Olympia’s tips for moving with small pets.

Moving Lizards and Snakes

You know better than anyone what your reptile needs to thrive. Most pet shops give a comprehensive overview on the environment a reptile requires to live, but if you are unsure you can always call and ask. Heat lamps, humidifiers, and live bugs are are often necessary when it comes to scaly best friends. So, how do you move a reptile?

Check State Restrictions

Not all reptiles are legal in every state. This applies especially to snakes, which often can face city and state laws restricting their presence in certain areas. Make sure that your pet is legally allowed to cross state lines before bringing it to your destination.

Get a Carrier

Ensure that your reptile carrier is the right size for your pet. Clean it, label it, and make it comfortable for a long trip. (Tip: Venomous reptiles need additional protective measures. Ask you veterinarian about the best methods for protecting you, your family, and pet.)

Acclimate

Get your reptile used to its carrier prior to the move. The goal is to reduce stress from an unfamiliar environment. Ideally, the best move would be to keep your reptile in its terrarium for the duration of the journey, but if it is traveling by air, make its temporary housing comfortable.

Doctor’s Visit

Get your reptile checked by its veterinarian within ten days of your move. Current health information is important to have when moving in case any complications arise during the process.

Moving Fish

The last thing fish are meant to do is move across land. Moving for over 24 hours can cause health issues in many fish, while moving for over 48 hours can be fatal. You will need an airtight plan to make sure that Nemo has a comfortable journey.

Clean Water

Replace about 20% of the water in your fishes tank a few days prior to your move. Then, whether you choose to use a bag, a container, or a five gallon bucket, you should use that water to transport your fish. Pull from the top of the tank where the water is cleanest. And, if you do use a bucket, make sure it is completely clean of any chemicals before you place your fish in it.

Last Minute

Don’t remove your fish from it’s tank until absolutely necessary. If possible, it should be the last thing to cross the threshold of your old home.

48-Hour Fast

It’s recommended that you not feed your fish 24-48 hours prior to you’re move. This lessens the need to clean their container/water while traveling.

Container Environment

Regardless of the container you use, make sure that your fish’s ride has 1) enough oxygen and 2) the proper temperature. Fish can die from being shut into their containers or from increased cold or heat. If you are moving a fish that requires warmth, a hot water bottle pressed to the outside of the container can help maintain warmth (this works for lizards, too!). For fish the thrive in room temperature, pay close attention to their water temps while travelling, especially in hot climates.

Tanks

Keep anything that was in the tank in the same tank water. This applies to decorations, filters, and any other objects. Do not clean them, or you will risk losing the good bacteria that helps keep your fish alive in its habitat.

Additionally, you can protect the tank by wrapping it in moving blankets or having it crated. Make sure to cover up the mouth of the tank to protect it from outside debris and contamination. Inform your movers about the care that the tank needs to move if you are not loading the truck yourself.

Moving Rodents (Hamsters, Guinea Pigs, Rats, Mice)

Thankfully, moving rodents is more similar to moving a dog or a cat than a reptile or fish. Read Checklist For Moving With Pets for some good general tips on moving furry friends.

In general, a trip to the vet prior to moving, a clean, airy moving container, plenty of food and water, and proper temperatures will ensure a good move. The main goal is to reduce stress as much as possible, so take as many precautions as you can prior to moving to keep from disturbing your pet.

Moving Birds

Wouldn’t it be nice if we could all fly to where we need to be? Unfortunately, your pet bird cannot fly to meet you at your new home (unless it’s on an airplane). Birds can be very sensitive to change and thus need to be looked after with special care.

Check State Restrictions

Like reptiles, certain birds are restricted from crossing state or city lines. Understand what category of bird your pet is classified under before bringing it to your destination.

Strapped Down

If you are moving your bird in a car, buckle it’s cage into the back seat of your car. Unlike a snake or small rodent, a bird can knock it’s own cage over very easily. This can lead to injury for the animal or damage to the other items in your car. Make sure your bird is secure before you pull out of the driveway.

Acclimatize

Get your bird used to it’s travel cage and the car in small stints at least a week before your move. Purchase a cover to lay over the cage in there is too much direct sunlight or activity outside of the car, but make sure it will not overheat the bird during the journey.

Pack Snacks

Bring a surplus of water, food, and treats for your bird. Depending on what your bird eats, a cooler might be a good investment.

Grab a Harness

An avian harness can allow you to take certain birds out of their cage on long drives. You don’t need to constantly change the bird’s environment, but if you are getting out of the car to sightsee, you won’t have to worry about leaving your pet behind.

Monitor Temperature

Keep an eye on the temperature as you transport your bird. Birds are highly sensitive to changes in temperature, so make sure that you have a plan in place for maintaining a comfortable environment.

Safety First

Keep in mind, NO animal should ever be transported in a moving truck. This is not safe for the animal or the movers. Your pets should travel with you or with a professional pet relocation service.

If moving your pet seems like too big an undertaking, make sure the pet relocation service you choose is right for you. Just like anything else involving your pet, proper care should be the first priory of the organization you pick. Air Animal Pet Movers can transport your pet through air travel while Happy Tails Travel can assist with ground transportation.  There are many other options but, regardless, your pet should be transported by caring professionals. Check with the IPATA to ensure that you’ve chosen a registered relocation service.

Your Moving Crew

Talk to your moving crew prior to your move if you are loading specialized items like tanks and terrariums into your moving truck. These items require special packing and loading, so it is important to give the crew as much information as you can. Open communication is key to getting your pet’s home into your new home intact.

If you are looking to move, contact Olympia Moving and Storage today at 800-222-4744 or fill out our free estimate form.

On the Move: Cambridge, MA

Location: Cambridge, MA Moving Services

A Cambridge, MA to Cambridge, MA move | June 2019

Move Overview

A four-man crew went out to this two-story, four bedroom home in Cambridge. The house is 3,974 square feet on the edge of Cambridge’s Observatory Hill neighborhood, where many homes list for $1 million+. Olympia completed a partial pack for the homeowner the day before the move, then loaded and delivered the next day.

The positioning of the house gave our crew a logistics challenge. All of the home’s entrances were raised above the street, so a bridge had to be made from the truck to the upper walkway. The crew needed to use extra caution when transporting the heaviest items out of the house.

Partial Packing

Prior to our crews arriving, the homeowner packed the majority of their smaller personal and brought them to the destination. Save for a few dishes and decorations, all that remained in the home large furniture and similar items. The crew packed these the day before the move with boxes and moving blankets. Then, the next day, they returned to load and deliver the pre-packed items.

Cambridge Moving: All the Wrong Angles

Like many homes in Cambridge, this home had some tough angles for our crew to maneuver around. A spiral staircase lead to a third floor loft with a bed and a few other pieces of furniture. Once the pieces were guided through there, a tight doorway and another staircase greeted the crew. Plenty of protective measure went in to preserving the homeowner’s belongings in these cramped spaces.

If you are moving to or from Boston, contact Olympia Moving and Storage today at 800-222-4744 or fill out our free estimate form.

Tips for Moving Outdoor Gear

Warm weather and warm water makes summer a favorite among outdoor enthusiasts. Summer is also a popular time to move. Often, the greatest challenge of a move is knowing how to safely pack your favorite equipment.

Here are Olympia’s tips for moving your outdoor gear!

Canoes and Kayaks

Never fear water warriors! Your kayaks and canoes can be moved just like the rest of your belongings. Inform your moving crew ahead of time that you have a large specialty item and they can handle packing and loading it for you. Prior to that, it’s important to dry and clean any watercraft you are moving. You won’t want old, scummy water dripping on your furniture in the truck.

For older wooden canoes, consider wrapping the seats and interior with a moving pad or bubble wrap so that the entire item is secure. Wooden bench seats are especially vulnerable to chipping during transport.

 

Moving Fishing Gear

Fishing rods are at high risk of breaking during a move. Prevent this is to purchase a fishing rod case. However, if you are more of a DIY fan, use a length of PVC pipe, some Styrofoam, and packing tape to construct a protective shell around your best angling rods.

Your tackle box should be secured with packing tape as well, just in case a lot of loving use has weakened the clasps.

Moving Tents

Don’t be the poor soul who tossed your tent bag. Tents are one of the few pieces of gear that come with easy moving. Pack your tent bag as is. If you need extra protection to prevent tears in the canvas, wrap the bag in plastic wrap.

Moving Bikes

Bikes are incredibly awkward pieces of equipment to move. Unfortunately, in the absence of a bike rack and a car, the only option to move a bike is on a moving truck.

The first step to moving a bike is considering disassembly. If you can, removing the pedals, seat, and wheels will go a long way to making transport easier. The second step would be finding an appropriate box to store the bike. Unless you had the foresight to keep the box your bike came in, regular moving boxes won’t do the trick. Bike shops are a good place to go to pick up discarded shipping boxes from inventory deliveries. Leave the handles out when you pack the frame–it will give your movers something to hold when carrying it.

For the high-end bike own, there is an option to purchase a bike box. Bike boxes aren’t made of cardboard. Bike boxes are hard cases that certain bike frames can be stored in. Cyclist Weekly has a list of their top six bike boxes and bags.

Moving Skis and Snowboards

Much like tents and fishing rods, cases and bags can be purchased for skis and snowboards. They can be transported in your own car, especially if there’s fresh powder in your destination. However, if you plan on loading skis or snowboards into a moving truck, a long box may be preferable to a bag. UPS has a store locator to find somewhere to purchase large equipment boxes. Alternatively, wrap this winter gear in moving pads to prevent scratching and load into a wardrobe or lamp box.

Moving Gardening Tools

Not all outdoor gear is for sport. If you’ve got an armory of gardening tools, now is the time to start sorting. Much like fishing tackle, smaller items like spades and pruners should be locked in a tool box and secured. Tie together larger tools like shovels and wrap them in one or two moving blankets. For extra protection for you and your movers, use bubble wrap or towels. The key is to cover up any sharp edges so you and the movers are not hurt in transit and the tools do not scratch your other items in the truck. After wrapping and bundling the large tools, you can load them into a wardrobe box.

If  you are moving to chase more outdoor adventures, contact Olympia Moving and Storage today at 800-222-4744 or fill out our free estimate form.

 

What is an Interstate Move Overflow Shipment?

Space is major concern when you’re moving. Fitting your whole life into a truck is a daunting task. If you are moving interstate or internationally, sometimes an overflow shipment can occur. However, with the right planning and communication, your move can still go smoothly if an overflow happens.

What is an Overflow Shipment?

An overflow shipment occurs when there is not enough room on the truck to fit all of your belongings. This means a second truck will have to be brought in to ship the remaining inventory.

For an interstate move, if a driver realizes that everything won’t fit, he will call in a second truck to load the remainder. This truck will bring your belongings to temporary warehouse storage until it can be loaded onto a truck heading to your destination. This is to ensure that all of your belongings will still be packed and removed from your old home on time on load day, and does not cause  delays in clearing your origin home.

What Causes an Overflow Shipment?

An overflow shipment can have multiple causes.

The primary cause of overflow shipments generally occurs when either you or one of the other homeowners on the same shipment exceed the space estimate determined by your moving company.

Some people like to get a head start on their new home before they’ve arrived, but do not realize the effect of taking up extra space. Try to avoid buying items in advance that you will have to transport to your new home. Or, you may decide to bring items that you originally planned on tossing or selling. It can be tempting to add to the amount of items you are shipping, but we recommend avoiding adding to your inventory once your estimation is complete. If you decide to move additional items above what was originally discussed with your estimator, give the moving a company a call to let them know in case they need to adjust the planning for your shipment.

The second most common cause of overflow shipments is inefficient packing. Even with an accurate volume estimation, if your belongings are poorly packed, you will have more boxes than needed. Ensure that you pack smart–too much in one box can be as much of a problem as too little. For more information on packing, head over to our Move Planning Center, watch our How to Pack Video Series, or consider Hiring Packing Services.

I Need an Overflow Shipment, What Now?

An overflow shipment is rare, but sometimes unavoidable. The moving team will work with you to minimize the hassle. Ensure that the items you really need–beds, clothes, kitchen utensils–are in the first truck. Everything you pack will still arrive at your door, but make sure the important stuff arrives first. A professional moving company will stay in contact with you about your send shipment and work with you to make the process as easy as possible. Clear communication is the key to making sure that all of your belongings end up where they need to be.

For all of your moving needs, contact Olympia Moving & Storage to plan your move. Fill out our estimate form online or give us a call at 800-222-4474 for a free estimate.

Moving? Get Rid of the Plastic in Your New Home

Moving often reveals just how much junk we accumulate in our homes. Because of this, a move is the best time to get rid of the plastics weighing you down. By making a few simple changes alongside the major change of your move, you can reduce the amount of waste you generate on a daily basis. Evaluate the plastic in your home has you pack and declutter. Make a resolution to ditch these plastics and make it a greener start in your new home.

Plastic Water Bottles

Cleaning up reminds everyone just how many plastic bottles they go through. If you’re shocked to find mountains of Poland Spring in the nooks and crannies of your home, it’s time to switch to a reusable bottle. Hydro Flask, S’well, and Nalgene are some of the most popular kinds of reusable water bottles. You could also install a water filter in your new home, or use a pitcher filter like Brita.

Plastic Baggies

Most people, especially families, go through thousands of plastic baggies a year. Packing sandwiches and saving leftovers consumes a lot of plastic, but it doesn’t have to. Products like Juco sandwich bags, Bee’s Wrap, and (re)zip washable, resealable baggie can all replace the Ziplock in your cupboard. You can also replace plastic and aluminum wrap with reusable wax wraps like Bees Wrap.

Tupperware

Similar to baggies, plastic tupperware can be recycled and replaced with an alternative. Glass containers are easy to clean and last longer than their plastic counterparts. They are also readily available in most grocery stores.

Trash Bags

Sometimes, it’s not just the trash itself that is the problem. Trash bags are their own source of waste. Biodegradable trash bags eliminate a little-considered source of plastic waste. Biobag and If You Care are two examples of eco-friendly trash bags available to consumers.

Toothbrushes

Plastic toothbrushes are actually one of the biggest sources of ocean plastic waste. Bamboo toothbrushes are a better, anti-microbial alternative to the chemical-filled plastics most people use. Check out Bustle’s review of the 5 Best Bamboo Toothbrushes.

Floss

Yeah, floss! Floss and plastic floss containers build up in your garbage over time. Cocofloss, Eco-dent, and Humble Co. floss picks can be great substitutes for the classic plastic case and fiber.

Moving With New Habits in Mind

Moving is a big change. It can be very scary to leave the home you’ve known for a new one, even if it is just five minutes down the street. That newness, however, doesn’t have to be just about adjusting to new surroundings. Making a major change in your life leaved you receptive to new habits. Use this period of time to make changes for the better and you’ll feel better, too.

For more on eco-friendly moving, take a look at our blog posts Eco-Friendly Moving Tips and How to Recycle or Repurpose Your Moving Boxes.

If you have an upcoming move, contact Olympia Moving and Storage today at 800-222-4744 or fill out our free estimate form.

Charming Historic Homes Around Boston, MA

Massachusetts is rife with colonial architecture and history. Specifically, over 50,000 historic homes currently stand across the state. Many were built before the American Revolution.

In recent times, most houses on the market have similar styles. Consequently, many people are moving into historic homes for their character. Boston has an extensive market of available historic homes. As a Boston moving company, Olympia has plenty of experience in moving families into historic homes.

Check out this list of some of the most interesting historic houses around Boston.

Sunflower House

The first floor of the Sunflower House stands out thanks to bright yellow stucco. The red, English-style shingles on the roof add to the color. Even a large sunflower carving sits a story above the front door. This beautiful home brings color to the Beacon Hill neighborhood in downtown Boston.

Nichols House

Nichols House is located in Beacon Hill at the heart of Boston. Suffragist and gardener, Rose Standish Nichols, originally owned the home.  Built in 1804, the home was renovated in 1830. Currently, it functions as a museum.

Old Manse

Old Manse was constructed in 1770. Writer and transcendentalist Ralph Waldo Emerson, was its famous resident. Located just outside of Boston in the town of Concord, Emerson’s famous essay ‘Nature’ was first written on the upper floor of this house.

Longfellow House

Constructed in 1759 in Cambridge, the Longfellow House was once the headquarters of George Washington. In fact, Washington used the house as a headquarters for one year during the Siege of Boston. It’s view of the Charles River remains one of its defining traits.

Jame’s Blake House

Built in 1661, the Jame’s Blake house is the oldest house in all of Boston. Later, in 1896, the house moved about 500 feet from its original location. The home changed hands many times since its constructed, but is currently owned by the City of Boston. The home also sports a unique Western English architectural style rarely found in the region.

Paul Revere House

Built in 1680, this house is the oldest in downtown Boston. It was home to Paul Revere, whose midnight ride remains a cornerstone of American history. That’s why in 1961 the home was declared a National Historic Landmark. It opened for public tours after $4 million dollars of renovations.

Stonehurst

Located just outside of the city in Waltham, this house is the former country estate of Robert Treat Paine, a lawyer and philanthropist. Completed in 1866, this house sits right next to the Lyman Estate. In fact, Paine’s wife, Lydia Lyman, formerly owned the estate. Later, in 1972, it opened to the public as a park.

Oak Bluffs Gingerbread Houses

Although these homes are quite far south of Boston, they boast undeniable charm. Located on the island of Martha’s Vineyard, the Oak Bluff’s Gingerbread Houses are a collection of 318 Carpenter Gothic cottages that were formerly Methodist camp meeting houses. That’s why the entire area is a National Historic Landmark District.

Owning Your Own

If you love the beautiful historic homes of Boston and its surrounding towns, why not live in one yourself? You can find hundreds of historic homes in the Boston area, just waiting for a new owner. For example, listed historic homes can be found at Barret Sotheby’s, Cabot and Company, or Historic Homes Boston. Furthermore, a more general database of all available historic homes in Boston and around Massachusetts, is located at Antique Home’s sales directory.

Moving Into History

If you do decide to move into a historic home, make sure that you understand the challenges and responsibilities of ownership. For more information, check out our blog post about Moving Into a Historic Home.

Olympia has the experience to move you into your own historic home. We can make your transition from a modern house into a piece of the past easy and seamless.

If you are planning on moving into a historic home, contact Olympia Moving and Storage today at 800-222-4744 or fill out our free estimate form.

4 Tips For Moving Into a Historic Home

Old homes are filled with character and rich histories. For many, old homes are just as much a part of their family history as a part of the story of their location. There are many wonderful benefits to moving into a historic home, but there are also unique challenges.

Olympia has moved many historic homes in Boston, Washington DC, and Philadelphia – where there are an abundance of antique properties. Olympia Moving & Storage knows how to move in or out of a historic home quickly and efficiently, and use the best practices for you and your new home.

These are Olympia’s tips for moving into your own piece of history.

Your Furniture Might Not Fit

An extra-deep sofa or a king-sized bed may not fit through the door of a historic home. Tight spaces like doors, hallways, and unusual corner rooms can spell disaster for the unprepared. Measure the doorways and halls of your destination in advance, as well as the dimensions of your furniture.

If you find that your furniture doesn’t fit, a professional moving crew can offer solutions. One option is to disassemble the furniture piece so it can move through the tight space without damage. Then, the team can reassemble the piece in its new location.

Another option is to hoist or crane large items through a window. The team can pad and protect both the furniture and the window frame, then either hoist up the piece using rope and a ladder. If window is three or more stories high, the movers can utilize a crane to lift the piece.

 

Prep For Low Energy Efficiency

Moving into a historic home means giving up modern energy efficiency–at least for a little while. 1800’s architects did not design homes with energy costs in mind. Because of this, energy-saving appliances and fixtures are good options to reduce unavoidable energy waste. Understand what sort of wiring and plumbing you are dealing with prior to moving in so you can decide whether an upgrade is in order.

 

 

 

 

 

Antique Protecting

Protecting original furniture and fixtures is key during your move. Packing or protective padding and coverings are required for large, delicate objects like pianos, grandfather clocks, and glass tables. Some items may even need custom crates or special servicing. Again, a professional moving crew is the best defense against undue damage to antiques. For more on protecting furniture, see our blog post Protecting Furniture During a Move.

 

 

 

 

Protecting Your Home

The features of a historic house are works of art. Doors, original door frames, floors, windows, stained glass must also be protected from damage during a move. For example, intricate wood carving on walls can be nicked by other pieces of furniture moving past them. A professional crew can also take steps to protect against these kinds of damage as well. For more information, see our blog post Materials Movers Use to Protect Furniture & Your Home.

 

 

 

 

 

Know Your Home

Understand the history of your home. There are many barriers to making renovations and restorations to a historic home. Check the National Register of Historic Places for more information about general ownership. Individual states also have their own preservation laws. Fully understanding the responsibility of owning an historic home requires some research, so don’t wait to get started.

If you are planning on moving into a historic home, contact Olympia Moving and Storage today at 800-222-4744 or fill out our free estimate form.

How To Pack Records and Record Players

How To Pack Records and Record Players

Donna Summer, Fleetwood Mac, and Creedence Clearwater Revival all have to travel to your new home — make sure they get there in one piece! Follow our tips for safely packing records to move.

Use Quality Sleeves

Remove records from their jackets and paper sleeves. Toss the paper sleeves in favor of a poly sleeve for the record itself. Slide the jacket into its own outer sleeve, but do not reinsert the record into its jacket. Stack records vertically against their jackets when packing them into their box.

Invest in high-quality sleeves to prevent wear on jackets and records.

Pack Records Tight

Don’t leave records free to shift around in their boxes or they might chip on the ride to your new home. Pack them as tight as you can in 1.5 cu. ft. size (small) box, the best size for the width and weight of the records. For extra protection, fill your boxes with foam inserts, packing paper, or bubble wrap. Records can be heavy, so an additional benefit to a small box is separating your collection into manageable weights for moving.

If you’re unsure about the general best practices for packing, check out Olympia’s How To Pack series.

Keep It Cool

If you’re moving in high heat, your records are at risk of warping. Avoid leaving your records in the heat of the moving truck for an extended period of time. Interstate moves with records can be risky for this reason, so if you have the option, consider bringing your records in your car with you.

Make a Packing (Play)List

Keep a detailed list of all the records you own and their current condition to avoid unhappy surprises during unpacking. This also helps speed up organization when you arrive in your new home. Alphabetical order by artist is the most common method, but you can always pack your records in the order that you want to display them to save time.

How To Pack Record Players

If possible, remove the platter, tone arm, and turntable from the record player. Individually wrap each piece in packing paper or anti-static bubble wrap. Pack the player and its parts into a secure box with the heaviest pieces at the bottom. Fill any empty space in the box with foam, bubble wrap, and other sturdy material. If these parts cannot be removed, particularly the arm or needle guard, secure them with tape or twist ties.

If you are unsure about removing parts on your record player, focus instead on keeping all the components as secure as possible. Tape down any moving parts and secure the entire object in bubble wrap and foam. Just like your records, if you are putting you record player in a box, pack it with as little space as possible to prevent it from knocking around during the move.

If you and your record collection are ready to move, contact Olympia Moving & Storage to plan your move. Fill out our form online or give us a call at 800-222-4474 for a free estimate.

5 Tips for a Gardening Beginner

Moving to a new house is the perfect time to give gardening a try. As you settle into your new home, planting gardens is a great way to give the house curb appeal and make it a welcome outdoor space for your family to enjoy. If you moved from the city to the ‘burbs, you finally have more space to test our your green thumb. If you’re a gardening beginner, now is the time to get your hands dirty in your new yard!

 5 Tips for a Gardening Beginner

1. Decide What You Want To Grow

Like moving, a good plan is crucial to a gardening beginner.

Decide what you want to get out of your new space—and keep in mind that there are different levels of care for different types of gardens. If you’d like a no-hassle project that adds beauty to your backyard, consider a low-maintenance perennial spread. If you’re interested in a bigger challenge with tasty rewards, try out a bright vegetable garden.

2. Know Your New Yard

If you’ve made the jump to move farther north or south, research your new region. Hardiness zones help define which plants thrive in your climate. These are just guidelines, but they can be very help when selecting which plants will brighten up your new home. Check out the USDA’s Hardiness Zone Map.

3. Rain Is A Gardening Beginner’s Best Friend

If you have made the move from a dry climate like Phoenix to a damp climate like Seattle, keep in mind that your garden probably won’t need to be watered as much in periods of heavy rainfall or high humidity.

Protect your plants from over-watering. If your plants are wilting from too much moisture, try to plan your watering schedule around the weather—or befriend one of your new neighbors and ask a local gardener for advice.

4. Dry Heat? Fertilize!

Vice versa, if you’ve moved from a wet climate to a dry climate, you might need to take steps to help your new garden grow. Adding water-retaining fertilizer to your soil can assist even plants that are watered daily in dry, hot climates.

5. You Like Moving, But Your Plants Don’t!

Plant placement matters! While you are growing roots in your new home and community, your plants are doing the same. Observe your yard before planting to ensure plants are positioned to best meet their light, space, and soil needs.

If you have indoor plants that you are considering moving, be sure to check out our advice on moving plants.

If you’re thinking about listing your home, planting gardens, like home improvement, is also a great way to boost the curb appeal and price of your property!

Considering moving to a home with great gardening potential? Contact Olympia Moving and Storage at 800-222-4744 or get an instant moving estimate!

How to Safely Pack Gaming Equipment

Your Xbox, Playstation, and consoles are sometimes among the most valuable items you are moving. It essential to safely pack gaming equipment so it does not get damaged during the transit of a move. It’s dangerous for your gaming equipment to go alone – take this advice from Olympia for moving your consoles safely.

The Tips for Packing Gaming Equipment

First things first, give your game consoles and electronic equipment a good cleaning or dusting. You don’t want to pack dusty equipment.

Find good packaging

Gather all the packaging you’ll need. The original packaging is the best choice, since it has already been optimized to provide the most protection to your device. If the Xbox or PlayStation box is long gone, check out allcases.com to find the right size hard shell electronics box. Though it is not the best choice, a regular cardboard box close in size to your device will do, as long as you only pack gaming equipment in that box.

Protect your valuables

If you’re not using an original or specialized box, it’s essential to add padding to protect your devices from rattling around, cracking or breaking. Avoid packing peanuts – they give off static electricity which can cause your electronics to short out or reduce their life span. The best packing materials are newspapers, clothes, or anti-static bubble wrap.

Organization is your best friend

Keep cords and controllers with their console. Don’t forget to protect your controllers too! Improper packing can cause loss of sensitivity in the controller’s buttons and joysticks. Neatly wrap the cords and protect each controller individually. Put all the parts of each console into the same box, which will keep each gaming system separated and organized. Avoid packing anything that is not gaming equipment in the same box.

Label your boxes

Meticulously labelled boxes are an unpacker’s best friend. Keep a list on a pad of paper as you pack each item. Noting even the smallest of things will save you time later!

The Best Method to Pack Gaming Equipment

Follow these step by step instructions to safely pack your gaming system:

  1. Before you unplug anything, make sure you take out any discs or games inside your system. Leaving it inside can damage the game.
  2. If your system has a rechargeable battery, remove it from the system before packing.
  3. Wrap the console, controllers, and any accessories per the tips above
  4. Place a layer of padding on the bottom of the box before putting anything in it. Learn the “burrito method” in our packing basics video.
  5. Put the individually wrapped items in the box with the heaviest items on the bottom and the lightest on the top
  6. Fill in any empty spaces with extra padding or paper to make sure pieces don’t shift around during transit
  7. Place a second layer of padding across the top before you close the box.
  8. Label your box with everything in it! The more specific you are, the sooner you will be playing games in your new home.

By following these instructions you’ll be able to get to your new home and switch from Pack Man to Pac Man. When you’re ready to move, give us a call at 800.222.4744 or fill out our form for a free moving estimate!