How To Move Art And Paintings

How To Move Art And Paintings

Art is an investment. A single painting can easily cost thousands of dollars – and could even have a value defined as something else than the monetary worth of the piece. The value of art or a painting can be defined by several factors, including ritualistic and cultural factors, as well as sentimental value.

When you decide to move, the transportation of any art and paintings in your house should be handled with care. Without the right approach, you might end up disappointed when you open up these pieces at your new house, only to find that your valued possessions have been damaged. We take a look at the most effective methods to move art and paintings to a new house, without risking damage.

Woman looking at a painting she is going to moveMoving Your Art And Paintings

Moving seems like a relatively simple process. You simply pack all of your possessions into boxes, load them up in the moving truck, and they are taken to your new home. Unfortunately, with some items, you do need to take a few extra steps – this is especially important with the items you own that have a lot of value to them. This includes both monetary and sentimental value.

Wrapping The Art

The process should start with packing. First, consider if the painting has a glass cover at its front. If it does, then you can skip ahead to wrapping it with paper or bubble wrap. If not, however, you need to get some plastic wrap first. Cover the entire painting with this wrap as it will help to prevent damage to the painting itself.a couple taking down a painting they are going to wrap and move

You need to get paper or bubble wrap, as well as a lot of cardboard. Start by wrapping your paintings in paper pads – add multiple layers to increase the protection. Each of your paintings or art pieces need to be enclosed with paper or bubble wrap, as well as cardboard. Make sure to add additional cardboard at the corners of the product, should it be a painting.

For paintings and are framed in glass, put a thick cardboard cover over the glass before wrapping it with the paper or bubble wrap. This will act as a protective layer to the glass to sure that your item is transported safely.

When you place the painting or art in a box, be sure to add multiple paper or bubble wrap layers at the bottom of the box. In addition to covering the bottom region of the box, make sure to add some paper or bubble wrap to the sides as well. You want to maximize the protection of the product.

It is also a good idea to consider adding some scrunched-up paper to the bottom of the box, as well as the sides as you place the paper in the box.

Taking Precaution

Be sure to make appropriate marks on the paintings. Use a permanent marker to add an “X” to the wrapping of paintings where glass is present. This will help you see which of the paintings are at risk of not only becoming damaged but also a glass panel breaking.

The same procedure should ideally be followed for sculptures and other art. Thoroughly cover the entire item in cling wrap. Follow this by many layers of bubble wrap. The more wrapping you add, the better the protection. Make sure to mark the boxes of sculptures and other art, particularly in cases where the sculpture is fragile.

Large and small boxes

Most likely you will be boxing your framed art. You need to box your items in a way that will maximize the protection of your art pieces. After wrapping your framed art you will want to put it in a smaller box. The smaller box will have rolled tissue paper in it at the bottom and the top. This will act as a bumper while for the art piece and provides extra cushioning while in the box. You will then put the small box in the larger box with rolled cushioning inside the larger box to provide the same protection as you did with the smaller box. Check out our video on packing with small and large boxes.

 

 

Valuables and Fragiles

Protecting your extremely valuable and fragile art is a priority when moving. These pieces require extra attention. Depending on the art piece, putting the item in a traditional box may not be the best move. Extremely valuable and fragile items can be crated to ensure no possible damage. There are many ways to crate valuable pieces of art. Whether its foam covering, layered crate walls, or heated shrink wrap, all of these are customized to your specific art piece. This customized protection will ensure that these very important pieces arrive at the destination safely.

 

Crating Items Sculptures

If you do find that your sculptures are not appropriate for wrapping and fitting in a box, then you should consider crating them. This can be an effective method for keeping the sculpture in pristine condition while it is being transported. Many sculptures can have on angles and points that won’t fit into a traditional box. On top of this, some sculptures are extremely fragile. Packing these sculptures in a crate will be the best strategy for protecting this kind of art piece

When moving with art and paintings, you need to ensure you take special precautions during the packaging and transit of these items. We looked at a step-by-step guide to help preserve your precious possessions and ensure they come out in pristine condition at your new home. To hire a professional mover trained to pack for safety, click here for a free estimate.

How To Pack Records and Record Players

How To Pack Records and Record Players

Donna Summer, Fleetwood Mac, and Creedence Clearwater Revival all have to travel to your new home — make sure they get there in one piece! Follow our tips for safely packing records to move.

Use Quality Sleeves

Remove records from their jackets and paper sleeves. Toss the paper sleeves in favor of a poly sleeve for the record itself. Slide the jacket into its own outer sleeve, but do not reinsert the record into its jacket. Stack records vertically against their jackets when packing them into their box.

Invest in high-quality sleeves to prevent wear on jackets and records.

Pack Records Tight

Don’t leave records free to shift around in their boxes or they might chip on the ride to your new home. Pack them as tight as you can in 1.5 cu. ft. size (small) box, the best size for the width and weight of the records. For extra protection, fill your boxes with foam inserts, packing paper, or bubble wrap. Records can be heavy, so an additional benefit to a small box is separating your collection into manageable weights for moving.

If you’re unsure about the general best practices for packing, check out Olympia’s How To Pack series.

Keep It Cool

If you’re moving in high heat, your records are at risk of warping. Avoid leaving your records in the heat of the moving truck for an extended period of time. Interstate moves with records can be risky for this reason, so if you have the option, consider bringing your records in your car with you.

Make a Packing (Play)List

Keep a detailed list of all the records you own and their current condition to avoid unhappy surprises during unpacking. This also helps speed up organization when you arrive in your new home. Alphabetical order by artist is the most common method, but you can always pack your records in the order that you want to display them to save time.

How To Pack Record Players

If possible, remove the platter, tone arm, and turntable from the record player. Individually wrap each piece in packing paper or anti-static bubble wrap. Pack the player and its parts into a secure box with the heaviest pieces at the bottom. Fill any empty space in the box with foam, bubble wrap, and other sturdy material. If these parts cannot be removed, particularly the arm or needle guard, secure them with tape or twist ties.

If you are unsure about removing parts on your record player, focus instead on keeping all the components as secure as possible. Tape down any moving parts and secure the entire object in bubble wrap and foam. Just like your records, if you are putting you record player in a box, pack it with as little space as possible to prevent it from knocking around during the move.

If you and your record collection are ready to move, contact Olympia Moving & Storage to plan your move. Fill out our form online or give us a call at 800-222-4474 for a free estimate.